Way too much data, not in chronological order.  Google Docs had a field day with it.  I took the image and blew it up via Rasterbator.  It now hangs on a wall inside the Chronicle building like some kind of faux modern art piece.

-sfcsubserv 

It’s … perfect.

wnycradiolab:

From Wired’s Best Scientific Figures of 2012.


Figures contained in scientific reports are a neglected area of the design world. Typically intended for display to academic audiences in the cramped confines of a journal, they tend to be utilitarian and esoteric—yet while looking through hundreds of articles in the course of 2012, certain figures transcended the technical and rose to the level of communication art. They combined visual clarity, information density and insight into some fact of fundamental interest.


Featuring such gems as “Gardening with Fire” and “All the Birds in the World.”
wnycradiolab:

From Wired’s Best Scientific Figures of 2012.


Figures contained in scientific reports are a neglected area of the design world. Typically intended for display to academic audiences in the cramped confines of a journal, they tend to be utilitarian and esoteric—yet while looking through hundreds of articles in the course of 2012, certain figures transcended the technical and rose to the level of communication art. They combined visual clarity, information density and insight into some fact of fundamental interest.


Featuring such gems as “Gardening with Fire” and “All the Birds in the World.”
wnycradiolab:

From Wired’s Best Scientific Figures of 2012.


Figures contained in scientific reports are a neglected area of the design world. Typically intended for display to academic audiences in the cramped confines of a journal, they tend to be utilitarian and esoteric—yet while looking through hundreds of articles in the course of 2012, certain figures transcended the technical and rose to the level of communication art. They combined visual clarity, information density and insight into some fact of fundamental interest.


Featuring such gems as “Gardening with Fire” and “All the Birds in the World.”
wnycradiolab:

From Wired’s Best Scientific Figures of 2012.


Figures contained in scientific reports are a neglected area of the design world. Typically intended for display to academic audiences in the cramped confines of a journal, they tend to be utilitarian and esoteric—yet while looking through hundreds of articles in the course of 2012, certain figures transcended the technical and rose to the level of communication art. They combined visual clarity, information density and insight into some fact of fundamental interest.


Featuring such gems as “Gardening with Fire” and “All the Birds in the World.”

wnycradiolab:

From Wired’s Best Scientific Figures of 2012.

Figures contained in scientific reports are a neglected area of the design world. Typically intended for display to academic audiences in the cramped confines of a journal, they tend to be utilitarian and esoteric—yet while looking through hundreds of articles in the course of 2012, certain figures transcended the technical and rose to the level of communication art. They combined visual clarity, information density and insight into some fact of fundamental interest.

Featuring such gems as “Gardening with Fire” and “All the Birds in the World.”